A Success Story

July 10, 2017

Nadifa

I first met Nadifa six years ago – a bright-eyed, inquisitive young girl. And today, with this blog, I am proud to introduce to you a still bright-eyed, inquisitive young lady: Nadifa, US citizen.

Born in the North African nation of Chad, Nadifa spent most of her life in Cameroon before coming to Sioux Falls with her parents, three brothers, three sisters and her grandmother. Nadifa was full of questions, she wanted to know everything, she wanted to learn everything she didn’t have the opportunity to learn back in Africa. Soon, her school enrolled her and her brother in a tutoring program to help with English and other subjects taught in American schools. I became their tutor. Nadifa’s brain was like a sponge, asking for more and more and more.

From the moment she set foot on American soil Nadifa was happy. Why? I asked her. Because, she said, everything is readily available here, we don’t have to walk for a long, long time just to pick up the bare necessities. And my whole family, we can all be together. And after 6 1/2 years in Sioux Falls, Nadifa is still happy. She values the educational opportunities available to her, as a woman, here in Sioux Falls. She graduated from high school and is continuing her education. She is studying sociology at USD, hoping to graduate with a bachelor’s degree in 2020 and at the same time is working full-time as a food ambassador at Avera. She is proud of her independence – she has her own apartment, her own car and her own money – yet stays close to her family. Family, she says, is so very important, they are the best support system, they will always stick together.

After graduation, Nadifa hopes to find a job where she can help people – refugees, immigrants, actually anybody and everybody. She likes to keep busy. So, besides school and work, she volunteers at CNA as a classroom tutor, helping immigrants learn English, the first step to becoming a citizen. Was it important for her to become a citizen? Yes, definitely. I like living in the US, she says, and I feel much safer being a citizen. Going to high school here and learning about history and government helped her with preparing for the naturalization test.

And how is life different for young ladies here in the United States? She thinks that some of them take advantage of the freedom they have here. They are easily influenced by their peers and the local environment and they lose sight of their dreams and goals. She says she was raised to cover up – to cover her head and to cover her body with appropriate clothing. And she still dresses that way. In high school, she says, she was often teased by her peers, “Why don’t you upgrade to America?” But Nadifa didn’t feel the need to do that. She says, it’s important to feel comfortable with yourself, to always be yourself and do the right thing for yourself. And to never forget the value of family.

Always encourage – never criticize

Work hard and never stop dreaming

 

Written by Silke Hansen, ESL Instructor


Who? What? Where? When? Classes at the Center for New Americans

November 25, 2014

As a follow up to LSS President Betty Oldenkamp’s blog about the “most controversial and least understood” work being done at the Center for New Americans, I asked our Education Program Coordinator, Laura Smith-Hill to field some commonly asked questions by the public about classes held at LSS.

Education Program Coordinator, Laura Smith-Hill, with learners from her English classes

Education Program Coordinator, Laura Smith-Hill, with learners from her English classes

What kinds of classes are available at the Center for New Americans?

We offer four levels of English, three levels of Citizenship, STEP (Skills That Employ People) including Job-Specific English Classes, and Computer Classes.

Who can attend classes?

Any immigrant wanting to learn English can attend classes. Classes are free for everyone who has an immigrant visa and for those who don’t, they can attend by paying a small monthly fee.

When do you have classes?

We have English classes five times a day. Daytime hours are from 8-10, 10-12, 12:30-2:30, and 3-5 Monday through Thursday. Evening hours are from 6-8 on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

We offer Citizenship classes in the evenings on Tuesdays and Thursdays and on Saturday mornings.

How long does it take a student to progress through your program?

Every learner is different. The speed of program completion is contingent on the level of previous education, age, and penchant for language learning. We typically cycle through content every quarter and a learner is allowed to repeat until they have mastered that levels content.

Where do learners who graduate from your program typically go afterwards?

Some learners continue their education at Southeast Technical Institute to study for their G.E.D. Some learners attend Kilian Community College’s Bridges Program to prepare for higher education. And some learners go directly to local colleges’ and universities’ education programs.

How can I get involved?

 Contact Kristyne, our volunteer coordinator, at 731-2009 to start the process to become a volunteer classroom assistant.

Over 400 students pass through the doors for classes at the Center for New Americans new home at 114 S. Main Ave

Over 400 students pass through the doors for classes at the Center for New Americans new home at 114 S. Main Ave


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